15 Ways to Make Money With Your Bike As a Side Gig

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1. Deliver food via services like Uber Eats and Deliveroo

The number of reasons people need food delivered to their homes is as diverse as the people who place the orders. Use your bike to join the tribe – whether it’s Uber Eats, Deliveroo, Postmates, DoorDash, or the local equivalent. No money changes hands.

Folks place an order online or by phone, you pick it up and keep everything hot and fresh until you reach their doorstep.

No guesswork required since the company for whom you work will bring you up to speed on their training methods. Not every city services diners via bicycle, but if yours does, you can expect between $8 and $12 per hour. Deliver that pizza quickly and efficiently, and you can add a nice tip to that order!

Here you have our selection of the best bikes for deliveries.


2. Create a cycling blog

You can create an awesome cycling blog like the one you’re reading right now ( blush ). Running your bike website could be extremely rewarding and super fun to work on, especially if you love technology and computers in general.

According to this WPBeginner’s article, the most popular platforms for starting a blog are WordPress.com; WordPress.org; Constant Contact; Gator, Blogger; Tumbler; Medium; Squarespace; Wix and Ghost. Each is unique, so check them all out before you pick the platform.

Must you be an excellent writer to keep the attention of your readers? It helps, but you can still churn out readable content employing these five tips described by writers who know what they’re talking about.

I would recommend the following website if you decide to go into that path:


3. Operate a Bike taxi

When Trinity Bellatrix and Darrin Thomas debuted their Longmont Bike Taxi business in 2019, even newspapers wrote about their start-up. They invested around $7,000 in their sleek vehicle, the electric-assist bike they commissioned that weighs about 100 pounds and is capable of traveling at a speed of 34 MPH.

The couple did their homework to provide their community with an alternative to oddly-scheduled buses, automobile expenditures, and pricey cabs.

Fun and sustainable, the Colorado company’s blog says all there is to be said about making money while getting plenty of exercises. Best of all, customers agree that this energy-saving transport business is amazing.


4. Become a grocery shopper with Instacart

On March 23, 2020, USA reporter Josh Rivera made headlines when he wrote about Instacart hiring 300,000 additional workers because the demand for home grocery delivery had skyrocketed. That was before COVID-19.

Want to join up and become a full-service shopper?

Even after people are back to normal, business analysts say that this delivery niche will continue to provide jobs and spawn competitors.

Instacart remains the pioneer. Consumers shop from home and shoppers pick up items from each customer’s store of choice.

If you want to see what it would be like to join them, visit the Instacart website and find out if your bike is sufficient to convey food to people in your community. This company even provides sick pay, so it’s worth investigating.


5. Morph yourself into a bike messenger

Leave it to the editors at the We Love Cycling website to describe what the job entails without painting a rosy picture. If you’re considering this gig, here’s what you need to know:

Photo by Victor He on Unsplash
  • No slowpokes need to apply. You must be fast, flexible and unflappable
  • An upright, mountain style bike delivers the most reliability, speed, safety, and comfort
  • Expect to get “doored” and don’t be surprised if drivers hate you; they don’t like sharing the road
  • The amount of money you earn can depend upon the size of the city in which you work
  • On average, messengers work between 200 and 500 miles weekly in all types of weather
  • You’ve got to figure out where to pee. That should about do it.

6. Post advertisements on your bike

If you don’t mind turning your favorite ride into a rolling billboard, companies like AdsOnBikes.com and Ridevert.com are happy to provide a sandwich board for your bike that advertises a business. Your job is to ride around, promoting local businesses.

It costs you nothing to do this job, but you will be expected to drive around high-traffic areas and salary depends upon how frequently that sign is seen at various locations, specific dates and times. Your success is based on exposure rates.

You’ll need a trustworthy bike, an Internet connection and a resolute attitude.

7. Become a restaurant food delivery pro

According to a 2017 study conducted by Morgan Stanley, restaurant food delivery jobs were projected to increase by 11-percent of the total market by 2022. Then, Coronavirus struck, making this job even more critical.

Changes in the restaurant industry that include menu and container advances, technological innovation, facility streamlining, and increasing the number of new hires capable of delivering have increased job demand.

Not every eatery wants to hire a dude on a bike, but plenty of them are willing as long as the carrot cake reaches its destination, looking appetizing. The best part of this revenue generator is that you can limit your search to the neighborhoods you’re willing to travel.

If you want to stay in your ‘hood, you’re likely to keep your bike in better condition and minimize repairs since you’re not traveling all over the place.


8. Create a YouTube channel for biking

Buffer.com’s marketing library is filled with valuable tips on how to use technology to spread the word that you’ve got a product to sell, a service to provide or a message to communicate, and it has to be done via YouTube.

Photo by Christian Wiediger on Unsplash

Says Ash Read, the guy behind the tutorial that is supposed to help you create a YouTube channel for biking, the process is simple and includes only 3 steps. Not so. Unless you already have a degree in broadcast production, you’re going to have to scroll through around 10 pages of instructions if you want to master the art of YouTube.

9. Buy and sell bikes at auctions

In the interest of transparency, allow us to begin this section by saying that if you want to make money buying and selling bikes at auctions, you had better have a connection to a professional bicycle auctioneer, a police department or a municipal government authority since these are the most common conduits.

Where do you plan to get the bikes you intend to sell? While bike abandonment is one of the ways bikes wind up in auctions, plenty of them gets there after being stolen.

Are you willing to apply due diligence to find out the origins of the bikes you’re putting up for auction, or do you want to take the opposite road: buying distressed bikes at auction, fixing them up, and then selling them?

Either way, this can be a labor-intensive undertaking, but if you’ve got the time and patience it takes to get your foot in the door, it may turn out to be a very lucrative gig for you.


10. Rent out your bike via Spinlister

When you visit Spinlister.com, you will discover that it’s an international business. This premier bike rental/sharing service is unique in that it is universally connected. You list your bike.

Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash

Other folks search for a bike on the website. Financial arrangements are done online, app or select in-store kiosks.

How will people find your bike? Using the company search tool that sorts by city, zip code, bike type and dates on which the bike must be available. A booking is made and payment is done through Spinlister.

Since you have the potential to make up to $500 for renting your ride, you may not mind using your old bike to get around town while it’s on the job.


11. Get paid to ride to work

What’s not to love about getting paid at work and then getting paid again simply by leaving your car in the garage or your bus fare in its collection jar?

Organizations like BikeLeague.org are happy to help you earn two salaries while you positively impact the environment. This smart program benefits both employees and employers.

By offering you an incentive to ride your bike to work, your bosses encourage the use of effective, earth-friendly transportation alternatives, and you get the benefit of “at least 150 minutes of moderate cardiovascular activity per week” to qualify.

This is a win-win situation. You stay healthier, and your bosses get a Bicycle Commuter Tax Benefit described in this congressional bill.


12. Conduct bike tours around your town

For entrepreneurial spirits who want to use their bikes to make money but don’t necessarily want to work for the established businesses already, set up to conduct tours, launching a business can be hard work.

You need a business plan, a name for your enterprise, contacts within your town, a stockpile of bikes plus a marketing plan. According to Truic LLC, the going rate for guided tours that accommodate groups of 15 to 20 people is between “$40 to $60 per person for an afternoon adventure.”

You will need insurance coverage that protects you from being sued, plus legal documents that exempt you from liability should a client be hurt or injured during a tour. Check with your municipal government to see if you are required to get a permit or license to run your bike tour business.

Your personal experience will be your most valuable asset when establishing a bike tour business,” say the folks at Truic. Tour guides with naturally outgoing personalities and a passion for bicycling are ideally suited to this gig.


13. Open a bike shop near a bike lane

Scout locations in close proximity to bike lanes, come up with a business plan, start-up money (bank loan? Uncle Henry?), pick an attention-getting brand name and decide whether or not you want to sell new, used or both types of bikes. Contact bicycle companies to establish relationships and order inventory.

Photo by Waldemar Brandt on Unsplash

Use the Internet to your advantage by launching a website, so online shoppers find you. Create an ongoing promotional plan to put the name of your business in front of the public in creative ways and, importantly, follow that excellent advice on opening a bike shop. You’ll be glad you did!


14. Launch a bike repair business

As one of the few gigs, you can undertake from your garage, basement or yard shed, bike repair revenues are going to flow in contingent upon the number of hours you’re willing to work on bikes.

The secret to finding clients is to hang out everywhere cyclists do and make your presence known: clubs, organizations, and community groups. One great way to get your foot in the door is to apprentice for an existing repair business to see how this type of business is run.

Unless you live in the deep south, prepare to operate on a seasonal cycle. Invest in high-quality tools and parts and make sure you deliver on promises. If you say a bike will be ready for pickup on a specific date, make good on your commitment.

It’s always a good idea to affiliate with a professional organization that can provide you with training, advice, and tools you need to succeed as an independent bicycle dealer. Look into affiliating with the National Bicycle Dealer’s Association to assess benefits this group and others offer their members.


15. Convert regular bikes to e-bikes

Another great idea is to hop on the e-bike trend bike converting regular bikes into e-bikes. Believe me; it’s not that complicated as you might think. If you get it correctly and start flipping bikes as quickly as possible, you will make a ton of money.

Here you have a great video explaining how to convert a normal bike into an e-bike.

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